Local News for Monday 11th September 2017

Major exercise at Stornoway Airport
Emergency teams from all services were involved in a major exercise at Stornoway Airport on Saturday, testing effective working between teams on a simulated major incident. As well as fire, police and ambulance officers, Stornoway Coastguard Rescue Team and the MCA duty officer AC18 welcomed what they called: “Great training with partner agencies and a major test of interoperability and incident command.”

Read more: Local News for Monday 11th September 2017

Local News for Friday 8th September 2017

Transocean Winner report
The Marine Accident Investigation Bureau has released their report into the grounding of the oil drilling platform Transocean Winner on Dalmore in Lewis last summer. They conclude that poor weather information, a worn tow line and inadequate assessment of the conditions by the master of the towing vessel all contributed to the incident. MAIB said that the tug ALP Forward was incapable of controlling the tow in the high winds and seas experienced. Voyage planning did not consider the effect of high winds on Transocean Winner and the master’s attempts to maintain control of the tow placed strain on a tow line which was already in poor condition. After the tug lost the tow, the Stornoway-based UK Coastguard investigated alternative tugs and called the emergency towing vessel Herakles, then at Kirkwall in Orkney some 12 hours from Lewis. It was unable to arrive at the accident site before Transocean Winner grounded, but MAIB said that it was very unlikely that it would, in any case, have been able to provide any practical assistance. MAIB said: “The effect of the wind on Transocean Winner led to ALP Forward being incapable of controlling the wind and tow in the severe weather conditions. The planning of a passage so close to the coast left little sea room for the tug and tow to drift. When ALP Forward lost control of the tug and tow, it was very likely that Transocean Winner would have grounded even if the tow line had not parted. The tow line was in a generally poor condition, (but) it is quite possible that a new tow line would have also parted under the same circumstances and conditions”.

Read more: Local News for Friday 8th September 2017

Local News for Thursday 7th September 2017

E. Coli scare in Tolsta water
Householders in Tolsta were told this week to boil all their water, after a routine test by Scottish Water revealed the presence of E. Coli bacteria in the Tolsta Village Service Reservoir. The reservoir serves 218 properties. Scottish Water said they consulted with NHS Western Isles before putting a boil notice in place, directly advising the households affected. They said drinking and cooking water should be boiled before use, but that the water is safe to use once it has been boiled. Bottled water was also provided to customers, which was to be used until they received the all-clear by letter. A Scottish Water spokesman said: “We are continuing to investigate the cause of this failure. Tolsta Service Reservoir is being inspected and further sampling and laboratory analysis is taking place. We would like thank customers for their understanding and patience and apologise for the inconvenience while this notice is in place.”

Read more: Local News for Thursday 7th September 2017

Local News for Wednesday 6th September 2017

Man dies in Harris
The body of a 52-year-old Leverburgh man was recovered from the water at Strond in Harris on Saturday, after Police were alerted to an incident around 4pm. Coastguard teams from Tarbert and Scalpay assisted ambulance personnel in recovering the man, who was sadly found to have died. Police are investigating the circumstances around the incident.

Read more: Local News for Wednesday 6th September 2017

Local News for Tuesday 5th September 2017

Coastguard radio changes
HM Coastguard are reminding boat owners, shipping companies and anyone who puts out to sea that they need to make sure they’re ready for the changeover of some VHF channel numbers used to contact UK Coastguard. The changes take place from 10am tomorrow (Wednesday) and will mean that existing channels will no longer be used for either Maritime Safety Information (MSI) or Radio Medical Advice. The new channels to use will be VHF 62, 63 and 64. The use of VHF Channel 10 for MSI and pollution control (back up) is unchanged. Mark Lawson from the Maritime & Coastguard Agency said: ‘We’ve been putting information out about the changes for some months now. This is an absolute changeover so people do need to be ready to start using the channels from 10am on 6th September. Although the MCA will keep the existing channels for about a year, they will not be routinely monitored. Your existing VHF radios should already have the new channels, but owners should check.”

Read more: Local News for Tuesday 5th September 2017